Calling on the international humanitarian sector to do more to respond to the needs of the world’s most vulnerable people

Calling on the international humanitarian sector to do more to respond to the needs of the world’s most vulnerable people

In recent years, Governments and aid organisations have made various commitments about ensuring that the world’s most vulnerable people are not “left behind”.

But those commitments are not being reached. We estimate in the 2018 World Disasters Report that millions of people living in crisis are not receiving the humanitarian assistance they desperately need.

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The report identifies five mistakes that can lead to international humanitarian actors inadvertently leaving people behind. It also includes clear and compelling recommendations to overcome these structural problems.

The full report
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file size 49MB
Executive summary

3,751

natural hazards have been recorded over the last 10 years, more than one every day

84.2%

of these had weather-related triggers

134,000,000

people need assistance in 2018, according to the UN

Chapter summaries

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Chapter one

Leaving no one behind

How do we adjust our response to prevent people in need from falling through the cracks? Humanitarian principles point to serving those most in need, so what’s stopping the international community from achieving this goal?

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Chapter four

Left out of the loop: the people unintentionally excluded

Are we offering the right support, in ways communities can use it? Some vulnerable groups, such as older persons and people with disabilities, are unintentionally but systematically left out because of simple mistakes that come down to language, communication skills or access issues. How do we turn this around?

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Chapter two

Out of sight: the people not seen

The sector may lack information about the number of people or their location, or the people themselves may be unable to provide proof of identity or eligibility. Poor or non-existent mapping,particularly in remote areas and fast-growing urban slums, can also render entire communities invisible. Here is why that happens and how we can address it.

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Chapter five

Out of money: the people who are not prioritized

The massive and growing gap between funds needed by humanitarian groups and funds available to them is a major factor in people missing out. This gap has been growing for more than a decade and some crises attract far more donor attention than others. What can we do about making the funds we have go further?

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Chapter three

Out of reach: the people who are difficult to access

Geography, insecurity, and restrictive policies from affected States and donors cut people off from humanitarian assistance. How can we support hard to reach people regardless of the obstacles?

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Chapter six

Out of scope: the people who “aren’t our problem”

Are donors and humanitarians blind to the crises that do not fit within traditional categories of conflict, disaster, displacement or disease? As the nature and contexts of human suffering continue to change, the humanitarian system will need to evolve.

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Chapter seven

Trends in disasters and IFRC insights

What can we learn from the latest data about the nature, frequency and location of disaster events? We take stock of global disaster trends and what they have meant for the IFRC network’s disaster risk management efforts.

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Chapter eight

Read our Conclusions

The World Disasters Report 2018 presents six clear and compelling recommendations to governments, donors, and international humanitarian organizations that can help the whole sector to support more people in need.

Read the report

The report identifies five mistakes that can lead to international humanitarian actors inadvertently leaving people behind. It also includes clear and compelling recommendations to overcome these structural problems.

The full report
Download PDF
file size 49MB
Executive summary

About the World Disasters Report

The questions, challenges and expertise within the 2018 World Disasters Report come from the sharp end of humanitarian action: from local volunteers providing life-saving and life-changing support within their own communities. The report relies in large part on consultations with National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies around the world, focusing on the examples most frequently cited by them when asked to identify who is being left behind. The analysis reflects the experience and concerns of IFRC’s global network and of the community-based volunteers that are at its core.