Homs, Syria 2017

Dr. Ruba Attasi has worked with SARC as a pediatrician for 2 years at the Homs Ghouta facility. She sees around 35 patients a day. “I have two children of my own, so when I see any baby here at the clinic I feel like a mother, I have instant maternal feelings. When I can make a difference I am very happy."

The Ghouta clinic has existed since before the crisis. Then, most patients were Iraqi refugees. Now the majority are displaced Syrians from Old City and Rural Homs. This Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC) facility, supported by IFRC, has two internal disease clinics, pediatrics, gynecology and a dental clinic. The busiest are the two internal disease clinics, which are always full. Earlier in the crisis, this facility was the only place offering vaccinations in the area.

Dr Attasi has worked with Syrian Arab Red Crescent as a paediatrician for two years at the Homs Ghouta health clinic. She sees around 35 patients a day.

Syrian Arab Red Crescent was admitted to the IFRC in 1948. In 2015, it counted 7,556 active volunteers (up from 1,500 in 2011).

Latest news from Syrian Arab Red Crescent

Jaramana, Syria, February 2017.

Obstetrics and Gynecology specialist Dr. Talib at theSARC Jeremaneh clinic supported by IFRC. Pregnant displaced women face additional challenges, including stress and lack of food. Dr. Talib offers advice and medical support, treating around 35 patients every day. 

Before the crisis, Jaramana had a population of around half a million people. Now, with high numbers of displaced people arriving in the area, it is home to 2million. The SARC clinic in Jeremaneh sees 400 patients every day. The majority are displaced people. This clinic provides free medical consultations and medicines. It is a lifeline for the community.

Dr Talib has worked for Syrian Arab Red Crescent at the Jaramana clinic in obstetrics and gynecology for a year

23 May 2017
20170315-SY-Syria-livelihoods-carpet-Sahar

Before the crisis, looms could be seen in souks and artisan workshops, where visitors could watch traditional and new designs weaved by hand with painstaking intricacy. The Red Crescent is helping to rebuild this tradition

22 May 2017
Rural Hama, Syria 2017

Best friends Jameela, 35 and Arwa, 33 do everything together, from shopping to childcare to going to the doctor. They were both displaced by the crisis and now live in Salemiyeh, Rural Hama. 

Jameela and Arwa are among many displaced people in this area who depend on the Syrian Arab Red Crescent clinic in Salemiyeh for medicines and health care for their family.

Jameela, 35 and Arwa, 33 have been best friends from childhood. They do everything together. When one decided to move from Salamiyah to Homs for work, the other followed.

19 May 2017
Jaramana, Syria, February 2017.

Ruba, a receptionist at the Syrian Arab Red Crescent clinic in Jaramana, supported by IFRC. There are 46,000 patients at this clinic. The team at reception help to triage cases to decide who need urgent treatment. 

Before the crisis, Jaramana had a population of around half a million people. Now, with high numbers of displaced people arriving in the area, it is home to 2million. The SARC clinic in Jeremaneh sees 400 patients every day. The majority are displaced people. This clinic provides free medical consultations and medicines. It is a lifeline for the community.

Ruba is one of four volunteers working at the reception of the SARC clinic in Rural Jaramana. She has been a Red Crescent volunteer for 10 years.

18 May 2017
20170517-SY-Syria-Lattakia-sheep-01

Three months ago, Syrian Arab Red Crescent provided sheep to 21 families in Qadisiya, a village in Latakia governorate. One man explains how the whole community has benefitted

17 May 2017
Homs, Syria 2017

Nurse Yohanna at the internal diseases clinic in Shamas. "Here we are helping people who do not have anybody else to help them." 

The Shamas clinic treats both local people and those displaced by the crisis. This Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC) facility, supported by IFRC, has an internal disease clinic, pediatrics, gynecology and a dental clinic. Some of the patients in this area experience high levels of poverty, so having access to free health treatment and medicine is vital.

Yohanna is a nurse in internal medicine at the Syrian Arab Red Crescent clinic in Shabas, which is supported by IFRC.

16 May 2017
View the Syrian Arab Red Crescent news archive from our old site.

 Syrian Arab Red Crescent volunteer stories

Contact
Address
00963 11 332 7691
00963 11 332 7698
Online
People
  • President: Eng. Khaled HBOUBATI
  • Vice-President: Dr. Mohamed Walid SANKARI
  • Treasurer: Dr. Issam SHALHOUB
  • Member: Dr. Ahmad AL-MASALMEH
  • Member: Dr. Fadio AYASH
  • Member: Mr. Mohammad AL-MASHHOUR
  • General Director: Mr Marwan ABDULLAH

Recent documents

Document library