International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc The website of the international Red Cross Red Crescent Movement Wed, 23 Oct 2019 13:19:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.12 Lebanese Red Cross mobilizes 1,000 paramedics and 160 ambulances to support thousands of people https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/10/22/lebanese-red-cross-mobilizes-1000-paramedics-160-ambulances-support-thousands-people/ Tue, 22 Oct 2019 08:19:01 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=57285 The Lebanese Red Cross is providing first aid and emergency medical transportation to hospitals for people who took to the streets across Lebanon. “Our teams remain in full alert to respond the unfolding emergency. We have mobilized more than 1,000 paramedics and 160 ambulances all over Lebanon,” said Georges Kettaneh, Lebanese Red Cross Secretary General. […]

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The Lebanese Red Cross is providing first aid and emergency medical transportation to hospitals for people who took to the streets across Lebanon.

“Our teams remain in full alert to respond the unfolding emergency. We have mobilized more than 1,000 paramedics and 160 ambulances all over Lebanon,” said Georges Kettaneh, Lebanese Red Cross Secretary General.

Since 16 October, the Red Cross has responded to 1,160 emergency cases. More than 617 people have been taken care of in Red Cross centres and 142 units of blood have been provided by transfusion services.

“As civilian cars were unable to cross the checkpoints, we provided transportation to 258 patients needing kidney dialysis, MRI and urgent hospital treatment of which 46 cancer patients were transported from Northern Lebanon to the Saint Jude Hospital in Beirut.”

The Red Cross called on demonstrators to facilitate its movement to be able to continue saving lives.

 

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Urgent action needed for countries in Southern Africa threatened by drought https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/10/18/urgent-action-needed-countries-southern-africa-threatened-drought/ Fri, 18 Oct 2019 07:01:24 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=57154 By Dr. Michael Charles All countries in the Southern Africa are currently experiencing pockets of dryness. Worryingly for the sub-region, Angola, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe have declared state of emergencies due to looming drought. The United Nations Climate Action Summit scheduled for 23 September 2019 in New York, United States of America, presents a timely […]

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By Dr. Michael Charles

All countries in the Southern Africa are currently experiencing pockets of dryness. Worryingly for the sub-region, Angola, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe have declared state of emergencies due to looming drought. The United Nations Climate Action Summit scheduled for 23 September 2019 in New York, United States of America, presents a timely opportunity for urgent global discussions that will hopefully culminate in concrete, realistic plans to address the disproportionate impacts of climate change on developing countries.

Teresa, 19, holds her baby son in front of her destroyed home in Dondo, Mozambique. IFRC/Corrie Butler

Southern Africa is one of the regions most affected by serious impacts of climate-induced natural disasters. This year alone, a succession of cyclones and floods has already resulted in significant loss of life and assets in Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe, and kept humanitarian organisations busy with emergency responses, as well as recovery and rebuilding efforts.

Tropical cyclones Idai and Kenneth were different in that they managed to attract global attention because they caused significant devastation during a short period. Climate change-induced natural disasters in Southern Africa are often invisible in the global media, even though they are protracted and threaten the livelihoods of millions. Even lower-level cyclones can cause devastating floods that are quickly followed by debilitating droughts.

Many national economies in Southern Africa are agriculturally based and as long as climate change mitigation strategies enshrined in existing global policies are not wholeheartedly implemented, a significant portion of the 340 million inhabitants of Southern Africa could be food-insecure in the long-term because of famine.

The increased mass movement of people from areas affected by climate-induced natural disasters is also more likely. Internal and external migration will necessitate greater coordination among humanitarian organisations to adequately support receiving communities and countries to respond to the added burden introduced by new arrivals.

The effects of food insecurity and mass movements are felt most by the vulnerable in our communities, such as the chronically ill and disabled, and women and children. They also place immense pressure on already strained health systems in many countries in the sub-region. With the necessary funds, the Red Cross Movement has the capability and is well placed to address some of the consequences. But urgent action is still needed on the climate change question.

In Mwanza district, Malawi, Red Cross has helped communities create gardens with smart irrigation to create greater food security, less reliance on rains and can harvest twice per year, at least doubling productivity. IFRC/Juozas Cernius

Climate change is certain and evident. Its effects are being felt more in less developed nations, especially in southern Africa. Efforts for adaptation are essential not only to decrease the negative consequences but also to increase opportunities for communities to be more resilient in the long-term.

Countries in the sub-region are acting to decrease their response times to calamities and improve their communities’ readiness to mitigate impacts of natural disasters. Mozambique is the first country in Africa to have an Early Action Protocol approved; the protocol harnesses the power of forecast-based financing to ensure that humanitarian responses are more responsive and proactive. Malawi’s protocol is under review and Zambia’s is currently in development.

The need for humanitarian assistance in Southern Africa in the latter part of 2019 and into 2020 will be greater with the imminent drought. Notwithstanding ongoing local efforts to improve countries’ and communities’ disaster risk management practices and increase their resilience, global stakeholders have a responsibility to definitively act to reduce the need for climate change-induced disaster mitigation efforts in the most affected developing countries.

Originally published in the Southern Times Newspaper  

Dr Michael Charles is the Head of the Southern Africa Cluster of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

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IFRC releases emergency funds to support Iraq Red Crescent relief operations https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/10/17/ifrc-releases-emergency-funds-support-iraq-red-crescent-relief-operations/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 06:19:50 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=57130 By: Rana Sidani Cassou Iraq Red Crescent Society relief operations to support people affected by recent demonstrations in the country have received a boost from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC). More than 150,000 Swiss francs have been released from IFRC’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund to help the Iraq Red […]

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By: Rana Sidani Cassou

Iraq Red Crescent Society relief operations to support people affected by recent demonstrations in the country have received a boost from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC).

More than 150,000 Swiss francs have been released from IFRC’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund to help the Iraq Red Crescent to continue its humanitarian support.

Since the start of the protests on 1 October, more than 200 Iraq Red Crescent volunteers have been mobilized to provide first aid to the injured, give psychosocial support, and medical evacuations. A total of nine branches have been involved in the response. The demonstrations have involved clashes that have resulted in several deaths, and many thousands of people have been injured.

The emergency funds will further strengthen IRCS capacity and ensure continuity of first aid and pre-hospital care to people at risk of being affected by possible unrest in the main cities of the country.

Meanwhile, and in the coming three days, millions of people from around the world are expected to arrive at Karbala city, 100 kilometers southwest of Baghdad, to visit the shrines of Imam Hussein and Abbas. Some of the pilgrims make their journey on foot from cities as far as Basra, about 500 kilometers away.

“Every year, we mobilize all our volunteers and employees to minimize the risks that might arise during this mass gathering,” said Dr. Yaseen Abbas, President of IRCS. “Some people walk for days including elderly, children and patients suffering from chronic diseases. We provide them with first aid, medical treatment all along their journey.”

With the participation of more than 2,000 staff and volunteers, IRCS installed more than 100 emergency health mobile and fixed posts in Karbala and on the roads that leads to it. So far more than 24,000 people have benefited from IRCS first aid, blood pressure measurement, evacuation to hospitals and awareness activities.

The location where pilgrims will arrive at the end of their journey is only accessible by foot. For that reason, more than 100 volunteers are there ready with stretches to evacuate people suffering from fatigue to the ambulances parked nearby. Two mobile hospitals have been deployed to the area as well.

In addition, more than 50 volunteers have one task:  look for missing people, mainly children, who might be separated from their parents because of the huge number of people gathered in the same place.

 

 

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Launch of Excel Social learning online pilot https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/10/16/launch-excel-social-learning-online-pilot/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 11:05:58 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=57097 What can a spreadsheet do? Or, better yet, what can 100s of people do with improved spreadsheet skills? From the moment IFRC started the Data Literacy program, we heard from people every day that we all need to collectively improve our data skills in the form of spreadsheet basics. Microsoft Excel is the most used […]

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What can a spreadsheet do? Or, better yet, what can 100s of people do with improved spreadsheet skills? From the moment IFRC started the Data Literacy program, we heard from people every day that we all need to collectively improve our data skills in the form of spreadsheet basics. Microsoft Excel is the most used and supported data tool across IFRC in every single sector, every region, and it is installed on most computers. We are fortunate to have a special relationship with Microsoft and Nethope to support National Societies in their digital needs, including access to Microsoft Excel.

Microsoft Excel program(

In our research, we found 4 different custom ‘excel spreadsheet’ training courses designed for the various audiences. We asked some questions – how could we use the mighty, pervasive Excel spreadsheet to support data readiness across the Movement? How could we learn from Microsoft Philanthropies experience delivering Microsoft Excel training across the world? How can we digitally connect our IFRC data learners with the Red Cross Red Crescent spirit and culture? When 100s of people across the Movement created the IFRC Data Playbook, we used participatory design and social learning as key principles to connect the trainers and learners. Teams and individuals with a data component in their workflows are using the Data Playbook exercises, slides, games and checklists within their ongoing training activities. We wanted to apply these lessons to Microsoft Excel training with a ‘learn by doing’ approach.

We designed this pilot to connect learners with data leaders, in cohorts of English, Spanish, and French language groups. By partnering with various groups/regions/sectors, we convened just over 200 early adopters to take this Microsoft Excel social learning pilot. Together with facilitators and focal points from various sectors and regions including health/wash, cash, surge/Information management, and PMER (Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting), we selected a course to serve their diverse, wider audiences. Our work as humanitarians is across many time zones and in 191 countries. We know that digital literacy, digital responsibility and digital inclusion are themes that we will need to focus on during this journey. The culture and spirit of collaboration is infused throughout our plans to help people get stronger with spreadsheets. Many people don’t finish e-learning courses. We will use the Movement’s community collaboration to help people learn, and hopefully complete the course.

Observations and Bright spots

On this journey, we are just getting started, but here are some data points about the pilot:

3 languages
76 National Societies
221 participants registered
43 women
26 Burundi Red Cross participants
2 National Society sponsors (American Red Cross, Belgian Red Cross)
15 facilitators /community helpers
4 volunteer translators for the cohorts and communications
1 Microsoft Philanthropy staff helper
2 Microsoft Philanthropy vendor helpers for curriculum design
13 modules (also downloadable for offline learning)
4 months to complete the e-learning course

Some key lessons:

Coordinating across time zones, departments/sectors, and teams takes time to build a common language/approach, while incorporating the organizational needs and goals.

We have encounterAlbaed many challenges about digital access, literacy, tools, workstyle, culture, and language. The pilot has served as a proxy study into the state of digital literacy and digital inclusion within the IFRC.

Our partners are here to help. We just need to have a clear task and plan with them. Microsoft Philanthropies has been an incredible help right from the inception of this project. We are learning much from them and we hope that this will help IFRC and other humanitarian organizations with their data skills upgrading plans.

People are very responsive and enthusiastic to get started. We also have been getting steady requests for the second pilot.

Thank you!

Microsoft Philanthropies and their partners have been working with us for well over a year to design, plan, and deliver this pilot e-learning course. Special thanks to Jane Meseck, Apurva Chandra, Mary Meucci, and Heather Daniel from the Microsoft team/partners for all their guidance and support. The IFRC MS Excel team aims to make this a valuable community learning experience. Thank you, Pierre, Margarita, Robert O., Sabrina, Munu, Bob G., Camille, Roxanne, Joseph, Letizia, Bertrand, Dedi, Amrit, Luis, Paula, Josse, Andrew M., David K., Nadine H., Dorottya, Boris, Alba, and Senyabou.

We will share more as we proceed with our lessons. Our next pilot will be in March 2020. If you are looking to update your Excel skills, there are some free courses online with TechSoup.

(Icon IconsAlfredo.com, Noun Project CC BY 4.0)

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Yemen’s Healthcare System on the Brink of Collapse https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/10/15/yemens-healthcare-system-brink-collapse/ Tue, 15 Oct 2019 06:40:09 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=57086 Text and photos: Julie Lorenzen, Danish Red Cross His brown eyes look tired – almost absent – and the skin is way too pale. He speaks with a voice that is difficult to hear. Nine-year-old Luai and his mother are visiting a primary health clinic, run by Yemen Red Crescent Society in Yemen’s capital Sanaa. […]

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Text and photos: Julie Lorenzen, Danish Red Cross

His brown eyes look tired – almost absent – and the skin is way too pale. He speaks with a voice that is difficult to hear.

Nine-year-old Luai and his mother are visiting a primary health clinic, run by Yemen Red Crescent Society in Yemen’s capital Sanaa.

Luai has been sick for a while with a fever that shows no sign of abating.

“His body is weak. He was fine, when he was little, but then his body started to weaken. I am worried, he cannot fight diseases,” says his mother Fatima.

Doctor Anisha examines the little boy and it does not take her long to conclude that he is malnourished and has anemia. There is also a risk that Luai is suffering from internal parasites, a condition common in many Yemeni children.

Doctor Anisha prescribes iron and multivitamins. That is all she can do.

But this visit to the clinic is a short-term solution. When Luai goes home, his parents can only afford to buy rice and bread because of the sky rocketing food prices in Sanaa. Vegetables are a luxury the family can only afford once a month – like so many other Yemeni families who suffer from the impacts of the 5-year long conflict.

Lack of medicine and doctors

According to doctor Anisha who has worked in the clinic for 17 years, Luai’s story is sadly familiar.

“Five years ago, we did not see many cases of malnutrition”, she says.

“But now there are cases in all health clinics around the country. I am worried because it affects their ability to learn in school. We only see the mild cases in this clinic.”

Doctor Anisha also sees many malnourished pregnant women which can lead to complications like low birth weight and premature births.

According to UN OCHA 3,2 million women and children in Yemen are acutely malnourished – the number of children suffering from severe acute malnutrition has increased by 90% in the last three years.

And it is not only malnutrition the children suffer from.

“We see that diseases like measles, diphtheria and chicken pox have returned. They were not present before the conflict,” says doctor Anisha.

She used to vaccinate the children, but the clinic can no longer provide this vital service. The vaccinations need to be stored in a cold place, but because of the lack of electricity and fuel, this is no longer an option.

It is the same story with the X-ray machine which has not been working since the beginning of the conflict. And the ultrasound scanner has been silent for the last year, since the clinic cannot afford to pay salary to an ultrasound doctor who can operate it.

Doctor Anisha is the only doctor to help the approximately 40 patients who come to the clinic every day.

“We need more doctors and nurses in the clinic,” she says, adding:

“And we need medicine to treat patients with hypertension and diabetes. We can check their blood pressure and blood sugar, but we cannot give them medicine. Medicine is the most important.”

The clinic has a laboratory, but currently they cannot carry out liver, kidney and cholesterol tests because of lack of equipment. Today it is free for the patients to get tests done in the laboratory, but in the future, the clinic might be forced to demand payment.

It is not going to be easy for the patients.

“Our patients are poor,” says doctor Anisha.

Stay and risk your own life

Many doctors and nurses have fled from the conflict in Yemen. But not Doctor Anisha.

“The future is horrible. If you stay here, you are killing yourself. But I stay and do my best. I cannot leave my patients here. I would feel bad, if they came and asked for me, and I wasn’t there.”

“We help people the best we can.”

According to UN OCHA an estimated 19.7 million people in Yemen lack access to basic healthcare.

But only 51% of the health facilities are functioning.

The Yemen Red Crescent Society currently runs 22 health facilities around the country.

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Call for Abstracts: Yearbook of International Disaster Law https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/10/11/call-abstracts-yearbook-international-disaster-law/ Fri, 11 Oct 2019 08:55:09 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=56967 Yearbook of International Disaster Law Brill/Nijhoff Publisher Call for Abstracts Vol. No. 2 (2019) – Deadline for abstracts: 31st October 2019   ABOUT THE YIDL The Yearbook of International Disaster Law (YIDL) aims to foster the interest of academics and practitioners on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made […]

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Yearbook of International Disaster Law
Brill/Nijhoff Publisher

Call for Abstracts
Vol. No. 2 (2019) – Deadline for abstracts: 31st October 2019

 

ABOUT THE YIDL
The Yearbook of International Disaster Law (YIDL) aims to foster the interest of academics and practitioners on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards, including rapid and slow onset disasters, but excluding events such as armed conflicts or political/financial crises per se.

The goal is to provide a forum for innovative research contributing to the international legal and policy debate related to prevention, mitigation, response and recovery phases in disaster scenarios.

The YIDL is a double-blind peer review journal published by Brill/Nijhoff and is available in printed and on-line form.

 

STRUCTURE OF THE YIDL
1. Thematic Section: this section includes articles focused on a specific topic. For Issue no. 2 the selected topic is “Disasters and…” in order to explore the intersection of disasters with other areas of international law and theoretical approaches.

2. General Section: This section contains articles addressing any topic relevant in the area of international disaster law.

3. International disaster law in practice: This section provides overviews and analysis on legal and institutional developments relevant for disaster scenarios, arranged according to international organisations, geographical areas and branches of international law.

4. Bibliographical index and books reviews: this section contains a bibliographical index and reviews of books related to international disaster law published in the year in review.

 

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
The Editors welcome submissions of abstracts for the ‘Thematic’ and ‘General’ Sections on the basis of the selection process detailed below.

We also welcome suggestions for books reviews of recently published books addressing any aspect of international disaster law.

 

DEADLINE FOR ABSTRACTS
Abstracts for potential papers to be published in the ‘Thematic’ and ‘General’ articles’ sections of the YIDL shall be sent by 31st October 2019 at the e-mail address: info@yearbookidl.org
Abstracts should be between 700-1,000 words.
Authors are also kindly requested to attach a short curriculum vitae to their e-mail.

SELECTION PROCESS OF ABSTRACTS
The selection process of submitted abstracts will be coordinated by the Editors of the YIDL and results
will be communicated to applicants in mid-November 2019.
Authors of selected abstracts must confirm that the paper they wish to submit has not been previously
published and is not currently under consideration for another Publication.

DOUBLE-BLIND PEER-REVIEW PROCESS
Full manuscripts (max. 10.000 words, footnotes included) are due by 15th March 2020.
Papers will be subjected to a double-blind peer review process managed by the YIDL, before being
finally accepted for publication. Authors shall take into account remarks received from reviewers in the
final submitted version of their manuscript.

LANGUAGE
The working language of the YIDL is UK English.

Click here for Flyer Call for Abstracts Yearbook of International Disaster Law (Brill) Vol. No. 2

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Latvian Red Cross raises awareness on migration issues with regional training https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/10/02/latvian-red-cross-raises-awareness-migration-issues-regional-training/ Wed, 02 Oct 2019 08:58:50 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=56793 By Agnese Trofimova, Latvian Red Cross Latvian Red Cross, in cooperation with the UN Refugee Agency`s Regional Representation for Northern Europe (UNHCR), has organized 5 regional trainings with the title “Work for the integration of refugees and immigrants: intercultural interaction, good practice and experience.” The training aims to build capacity and expertise of more than […]

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By Agnese Trofimova, Latvian Red Cross

Latvian Red Cross, in cooperation with the UN Refugee Agency`s Regional Representation for Northern Europe (UNHCR), has organized 5 regional trainings with the title “Work for the integration of refugees and immigrants: intercultural interaction, good practice and experience.”

The training aims to build capacity and expertise of more than one hundred service providers, public authorities and representatives of local communities. Organized in five different regions across Latvia – Rezekne, Puikule, Bauska, Saldus and Riga between 23 – 27 September, the trainings are part of the international Red Cross project “AVAIL- Amplifying the Voices of Asylum Seekers and Refugees for Integration and Life Skills.”

The representatives from UNHCR, Marcel Colun and Karolis Zibas, presented general information about the current situation related to issues of asylum, migration and relocation, the effect of legislative changes on results of the integration of refugees and immigrants, as well as overall integration policy and processes at the regional and national level.

Tamim Nashed, an independent expert on integration and intercultural competences and former Policy Officer at the European Council on Refugees and Exiles (ECRE), presented aspects of intercultural competences. Another speaker was a Syrian refugee living in Latvia, Sulaeman Alzouabi, who works as a doctor in a hospital. Sulaeman shared his life story and the experience of being a refugee.

The audience of these trainings were employees of state and municipal institutions, including policy planners, representatives from educational institutions, social and health care workers and activists from other non-governmental organizations.

After these trainings, participants admitted that they had received a lot of new and interesting information that will be useful in their daily work and communication with foreigners. Also, they revealed that from now on they will be more critical towards information about the migration crisis, refugees and intercultural interaction presented by media.

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Iran: Running for peace https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/10/01/iran-running-peace/ Tue, 01 Oct 2019 09:36:37 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=56774 Mojtaba Yadegari, a youth member of the Iran Red Crescent Society, has been running for peace since he was nine years old. Lately he ran for 17 consecutive days, throughout Iran’s 31 governorates, covering an amazing 310km. “I really enjoy running and I enjoy it more when I do it for a purpose such as […]

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Mojtaba Yadegari, a youth member of the Iran Red Crescent Society, has been running for peace since he was nine years old. Lately he ran for 17 consecutive days, throughout Iran’s 31 governorates, covering an amazing 310km.

“I really enjoy running and I enjoy it more when I do it for a purpose such as advocating for universal peace and friendship,” said Mojtaba, from the Red Crescent’s Markazi Provincial Branch.

“So far, I have done 27 sport activities totaling about 3,000km,” he said. “My objective is to follow the principles of Henry Dunant, the founder of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. I want to use my efforts to strive for global peace and friendship and to serve as an ambassador for the Iranian Red Crescent.”

Through his sporting achievements, Mojtaba hopes to promote a culture of non-violence and peace, familiarize the public with the work and objectives of the Red Crescent, and encourage other young people to become volunteers.

The 17 days of running were not easy, and the weather was sometimes a problem. However, “Each time I felt weak, I told myself I shall continue until I reach my objective no matter how hard it might be. I kept telling myself the finish line is not so far. I’ve come all the way! So, I can do the rest,” he said.

The people in the villages and cities that Mojtaba ran through have been a constant source of encouragement. “Each time I arrived in a new city, people cheered for me and even accompanied me in my run as a gesture of solidarity and friendship.”

After crossing all Iran’s governorates, Mojtaba now plans to run for peace outside Iran. “My motto is to advocate for peace around the world. I do this in my own country, but I dream of doing it elsewhere as well. My dream is to go to Geneva, Switzerland and run 10km for peace there.”

On his arrival at the Iranian Red Crescent Headquarters in Tehran, Mojtaba was welcomed and honored by Secretary General of the Red Crescent Society, its Head of Youth Organization, the Managing Director of the Tehran Provincial branch, senior directors, and many youth members and volunteers.

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Everyone Counts Report 2019 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/09/30/everyone-counts-report-2019/ Mon, 30 Sep 2019 11:42:53 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=56732 Has the IFRC achieved gender parity? Which National Society produces the highest quality of data? Who are the people behind the data? The 2019 edition of the Everyone Counts report explores the potential of data to tell stories about National Societies in a new and different way than anything that has been done before. The […]

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Has the IFRC achieved gender parity? Which National Society produces the highest quality of data? Who are the people behind the data? The 2019 edition of the Everyone Counts report explores the potential of data to tell stories about National Societies in a new and different way than anything that has been done before. The 2019’s edition focuses on themes of diversity and inclusion, and this report represents some of our work in analyzing how it is practiced in National Societies and at the Secretariat itself.

Our most recent round of data collection was the first that asked National Societies to report whether they collect disability-disaggregated data on staff, volunteers, and people reached by their programmes. Successes and challenges encountered by the more than 40 National Societies that collect this data are presented in chapter 4 of this report. We also discuss the importance of collecting disability-disaggregated data within the context of humanitarian operations to ensure that we are reaching the most vulnerable members of the communities in which we operate.

How are women represented at different levels of governance? In National Societies? In programmes? We explore these questions in chapter 5 and attempt to demonstrate how far the Federation network has come – and how far we must go – when it comes to gender inclusion. Rather than trying to avoid contentious discourse, this chapter lays bare the reality of gender representation in the Secretariat and National Societies with the intention of advancing the discussion around gender and gender parity.

Data is most informative when we draw it out from the screen and into the real world. Using the innovative SenseMaker research tool that captures stories from individuals in the communities we serve allows us to bring the data to life in ways that would otherwise not be possible. We traveled to Cambodia to examine the context behind the numbers, and to see how community-based health programmes implemented by the Cambodian Red Cross Society were transforming their host communities. These stories were told by the people we are committed to serving, and it brings our data narratives full circle by reminding us that the human impact is our ultimate goal.

Throughout this report, we have included ‘Dangerous Interpretations’ to encourage readers to engage critically with the data and to hopefully provide some new insights into how our readers view the work of National Societies. We consider it to be of the utmost importance that our community of readers are actively engaged with the data and can use it to generate their own ideas. Check out the Everyone Counts report, the FDRS website or this link to download the complete database.

 

From all of us on the FDRS team, we wish you happy reading!

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Call for Abstracts: Third International and Comparative Disaster Law Essay Contest, 2019 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/2019/09/30/call-abstracts-third-international-comparative-disaster-law-essay-contest-2019/ Mon, 30 Sep 2019 06:42:53 +0000 https://media.ifrc.org/ifrc/?p=56710 Announcement: Third International and Comparative Disaster Law Essay Contest, 2019  Call for Abstracts   Introduction This announcement calls for the submission of abstracts not exceeding 500 words for consideration for the third “International and Comparative Disaster Law Essay Contest”. This contest is co-sponsored by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), […]

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Announcement: Third International and Comparative Disaster Law Essay Contest, 2019

 Call for Abstracts

 

Introduction

This announcement calls for the submission of abstracts not exceeding 500 words for consideration for the third “International and Comparative Disaster Law Essay Contest”. This contest is co-sponsored by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), the American Society of International Law Disaster Law Interest Group (ASIL DLIG), the Jean Monnet Module on “International and EU Law” at Roma Tre University and the International Disaster Law Project (IDL) of the Universities of Bologna, Roma Tre, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, and Uninettuno.

The contest, open to current university students and recent graduates, aims to stimulate creative thinking and analysis about disaster law, from an international or comparative perspective.

 

Background

Over the last decade, natural and technological disasters, such as floods, earthquakes, droughts and oils spills, killed around 700.000 people and 2 billions of individuals have been affected worldwide. In response to related challenges, there have been several legal and policy global initiatives which are aimed at addressing these issues. These include the Sendai Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, the Sustainable Development Goals 2015, the Paris Agreement on climate change, the adoption of the Draft Articles on the ‘protection of persons in the event of disasters’ by the UN International Law Commission, and technical assistance provided by the IFRC and its partners to implement tools such as the IDRL Guidelines and the Checklist for Law and DRR at the domestic level.

Scholarship about legal and regulatory frameworks for reducing disaster risks, responding to disasters and recovering from them, is however still in its infancy. Yet states are increasingly turning to legal tools to fight disasters, at the national, regional and international levels. Are they learning from each other about what works well and what does not? Are international instruments meeting their potential to increase cooperation in disaster risk management and humanitarian response? Are international legal tools being translated effectively to the national level in terms of implementation and enforcement?

This essay contest reserved to university students aims to stimulate creative thinking and analysis about disaster law, in relation to these and other questions, from an international or comparative perspective. The first contest, held in 2015, drew submissions from 12 countries. The winning essay was: Giovanni Sciaccaluga, whose paper was entitled Climate change related disasters and human displacement: towards an effective management system (2015). More than 50 candidates participated in the second essay contest (2017) which was won by Miki Ishimori, whose paper was entitled Right to housing after Fukushima nuclear disaster: through a lens of international human rights perspective.

 

The contest will be managed according to a two-part process:

Step 1): Participants are requested to submit an abstract not exceeding 500 words dealing with disaster law, analysed from an international or comparative law perspective. Abstracts should be received no later than 15 November 2019.

Step 2): After the abstracts have been reviewed, the judge’s committee will invite the contributors of the most promising five abstracts to submit full essays of no more than 6,000 words (including a 150 word (maximum) abstract and including all footnotes) by 15 February 2020.

 

Eligibility and requirements:

  • The contest is open only to (1) students enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate degree program (as master or PhD students) at any university (anywhere in the world) at the time of submission; or (2) to students who have graduated from such programmes within 12 months of the final date of their registration period. Those whose abstracts are selected for essay submission will be required to produce documentary evidence of their registration as students.

 

  • Essays may examine any issue related to law and disasters, but must do so either from an international or comparative law perspective. Comparative essays should examine laws or legal issues from no less than two countries.

 

  • Abstract submissions must not exceed 500 words. Abstracts (and the essays) must be written solely by the candidate(s), in English, and may not have been submitted for publication elsewhere. This restriction will be lifted after the contest is completed, and, for the winners and “honourable mention” papers, after publication as IFRC Working Papers. Papers may have more than one author, so long as all authors meet all the criteria listed here.

 

Deadlines and method of submission

  • The deadline for the submission of the abstract is 11:59 p.m. Central European Time, 15 November 2019. Please refer to subsequent information on the ‘Competition procedures’ for further details. Participants will be notified if their abstract has been selected on 25 November 2019.

 

  • The deadline for the submission of the essay for those abstracts that have been selected is 11:59 p.m. Central European Time, 15 February 2020.

 

  • Abstracts and essays shall be submitted to law@ifrc.org as Microsoft Word attachments. In the subject line, please state “Submission: International and Comparative Disaster Law Essay Contest”. Questions may be directed to the same email address.

 

  • By submitting papers, candidates represent that they fulfil the eligibility requirements of the competition.

 

Award and announcement of the winning essay

  • The winner of the contest will receive:
    • A monetary prize in the amount of Euro 500.
    • A free annual membership in the American Society of International Law.

 

  • The winner will also have his or her paper published as a “Working Paper” of the IFRC’s Disaster Law Programme. They will retain copyright of their papers and may subsequently publish them elsewhere, according to the terms of the Working Papers series.

 

  • Other “honourable mention” papers, as selected by the final jury and if of appropriate quality, may be published as a “Working Paper” of the IFRC’s Disaster Law Programme. They will retain copyright of their papers and may subsequently publish them elsewhere, according to the terms of the Working Papers series.

 

  • A message announcing the name of the winner and runners up of the contest will be sent to all members of the ASIL DLIG, as well as to the co-sponsors and made public on the ASIL website. An e-mail with the final outcome will also be sent to all who submitted papers.

 

Competition procedures and selection criteria

 The file containing the abstract shall not include personal information on the candidate in order to keep a blind review process. On a separate attachment (or in the email accompanying the abstract), each candidate should include: the title, author’s name, author’s mailing address, email address, and phone number, university name and address, and academic year of enrolment (or the day of the graduation). In addition, contestants should include the following sentence: “[Name of author(s)] is the sole author(s) of this paper and complies with all requirements of this contest. This abstract has not been submitted for publication elsewhere.”

 

  • Personal data provided by the candidates may be shared between the IFRC, ASIL and Roma Tre University and shall be handled in accordance with applicable data protection laws and policies.

 

  • A submitted essay will be regarded as ‘published’ and therefore not eligible if it has been accepted for publication by a journal or book. Students are welcome to submit essays based on coursework that was undertaken during their degree programs so long as they meet all of the other eligibility requirements.

 

  • Reviewers and judges will be selected by agreement of the co-sponsors of the contest among renowned experts.

 

  • The assessment of the papers will be based on the following criteria:

– quality of the paper’s scholarship;

– originality of the paper’s research; and

– relevance of the paper to this area of research.

The post Call for Abstracts: Third International and Comparative Disaster Law Essay Contest, 2019 appeared first on International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

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