Rural Hama, Syria 2017 Zeina Halif, 23, is a nurse at the SARC Salemiyeh malnutrition clinic. “I like volunteer work, and I like children very much. I enjoy working with the doctor, and helping pregnant and lactating women. I love my job and feel happy when I can help people." The SARC malnutrition clinic in Salemiyeh has both a base in the town, and a mobile team of volunteers who go out to surrounding villages. The malnutrition clinic is one of 6 such SARC facilities, supported by the Canadian Red Cross, in response to the situation faced by displaced people and those living in hard-to-reach areas.

Photo: Tareq Mnadili

Zeina, 23, is a nurse at the Salamiyah malnutrition clinic. She has worked with Syrian Arab Red Crescent since 2014.

“I like volunteer work, and I like children very much. I enjoy working with the doctor and helping pregnant and lactating women. I find my work very interesting.

“I feel sorry for women when they are struggling to lactate, they are stressed and have so much to deal with, especially those who have had to move from place to place. It’s harmful for those women. I remember after one night of violence there was a big population movement. This had a psychological effect on the women and children.

“I remember one case, the mother was alone with her baby. Her husband had been taken by armed men. The shock made her milk dry up. But after she came here we could advise her how to get the milk back. She was able to feed her baby.

“I love my job and feel happy when I can help people. When I succeed and there’s a positive result for the family, I’m happy. It’s so great to find a smile on the face of a woman or child after they recover.”

 

The SARC malnutrition clinic in Salamiyah has both a base in the town and a mobile team of volunteers who go out to surrounding villages. The malnutrition clinic is one of six such SARC facilities, supported by the Canadian and Japanese Red Cross Societies, in response to the situation faced by displaced people and those living in hard-to-reach areas.